Transporting & Driving with Cannabis in Canada

Canadian Federal Legislature*

  • Legal Age: 18+ (minimum), or as specified per Province

  • Maximum Possession: Up to 30 grams, or equivalent, or as specified per Province

  • Retail: As specified per Province; online sales available in each Province

  • Consumption: Private dwelling and property, or as specified per Province. Prohibited in vehicles.

  • Cultivation: Up to 4 plants per household, or as specified per Province

Adult-use recreational cannabis was legalized in Canada on October 17, 2018.

The information on this website reflects the compiled legal frameworks of the Federal, Provincial Gov and Municipal Governments of Canada.

Click here to view Bill C-45 CANNABIS ACT. Source: Government of Canada

 

Transporting Cannabis in a Vehicle

Transporting cannabis in a vehicle in Canada is treated similarly to transporting alcohol in a vehicle. While each Province establishes their own regulations on how, or where, Cannabis should be stored, there is a general consensus across all Provinces when operating a passenger vehicle:

 

  1. Closed cannabis products (sealed from manufacturer)

    • Must be stored in the original container with the manufacturer's seal unbroken.

      • May be transported in the passenger compartment.

  2. Open cannabis products

    • May NOT be located within reach of any occupant of the vehicle. 
      • Must be stored in a fastened or secured container.
  3. Under no circumstances may cannabis be consumed in a vehicle.

 

Recommended: Store all open cannabis products and accessories in secured containers and in the trunk of your vehicle.

 

A comparative review: If you're still wondering how to determine if you can transport cannabis in a vehicle, a good way to compare the rules is with alcoholic beverages. For example,

  • A closed case of beer just purchased from the store may be transported in the passenger compartment.

  • An open case of beer, or individual beer bottles, previously purchased from the store may not be transported within reach of the driver.

  • Occupants of a vehicle may not consume alcohol.

 

Cannabis is very similar to a case of beer but slightly more restrictive in that opened cannabis products may not be within reach of any vehicle occupant.

 

 

Impaired driving

Impaired driving is the leading criminal cause of death and injury in Canada. In 2016, there were more than 70,000 impaired driving incidents reported by the police, including almost 3,000 drug-impaired driving incidents. The Criminal Code prohibits driving while impaired to any degree by drugs and alcohol. 

 

Cannabis consumption in any vehicle is strictly prohibited in Canada.

 

Bill C-46

On April 13, 2017, the Government of Canada introduced Bill C-46, the most comprehensive reform to the Criminal Code transportation regime in more than 40 years. The Bill passed Parliament on June 20, 2018 and received Royal Assent on June 21, 2018. 

  • Part 1 of the new impaired driving legislation, which introduces new offences for drug-impaired driving, came into force on June 21, 2018.

  • Part 2 of the new impaired driving legislation will be implemented December 18, 2018.

 

The new law is a modern, simplified, and more coherent system of reforms to better deter and detect drug and alcohol-impaired driving. It is important to note that provinces and territories have additional laws or regulations that may apply. Make sure to check the laws in your area

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Driving while impaired, whether by alcohol, or cannabis, or other drugs, is a serious crime and puts the safety of everyone at risk. Click here to read more from the Canadian Department of Justice >>

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